Lighting and Projection Design

Movement 1

Scene 4

Movement 1

Scene 4

Movement 2

Scene 1

Movement 2

Scene 14

        "With the scenic elements of our production remaining largely unchanged physically throughout the show, the visual transition between the over and underworlds is almost entirely illustrated through lighting and projections. Each the over and underworlds have not only a distinctly different color palette, but they also have a different tone and light quality which allows us to transition seamlessly between the two. The overworld relies on the illusion of natural light leaving it to feel familiar and inviting. Using the projection of a familiar skyline, we are able to provide a sense of immediate grounding. Additionally, working to simulate sunlight onstage not only brings a sense of reality to what we see in the stage picture, but also allows me to visually depict the passing of time and the ephemerality of a day as its placement moves throughout the play. The underworld on the other hand, needed to be unfamiliar to an audience. The first change we see the first time we encounter the underworld is the view of the projected skyline changing as a visual cue that we are no longer in the same span of linear time as before. Using strong colors and static textures in lighting, an illusion is created that time has slowed down considerably or even stopped in the underworld. We were also able to work with some of the existing architectural elements of the theatre such as the large, painted brick, upstage wall. When acknowledged and lit in the underworld, these allow us to create an unusual amount of depth and dimension in a confined space continuing the illusion of expansion and ceaselessness we find here. Something very important to our whole team was maintaining the ability to transition between worlds in an instant and the support of lighting and projections played a crucial role in that." 


        "Something unique in this play and its characters, is their relationship with memory or lack thereof. The first time we see Eurydice enter the underworld through the elevator is a huge transitional moment in the show and there were a few things that I was able to highlight there with lighting. The first time that the elevator appears onstage is the first time when the underworld is fully revealed to us. It was important to me to allow the audience to discover this alongside her in this way, and facilitate a new level of connection and understanding between Eurydice and the audience. Many of the lighting looks and effects that we see in the overworld are later mirrored in the underworld giving it a vague sense of familiarity. Though without context they lose their meaning, much like the memories of the characters. That being said, this play is also a story of personal connection, and though I wanted these things to be present throughout the play, I also wanted them to be universal. It was important to me to fill this show with threads and parallels between the worlds and the characters, but to allow each audience member to discover and connect with them for themselves."

Lauren Smith

Lighting and Projections Designer

 

Lauren is in her third year at Hunter studying theatrical design and production, as well as arts management. This is Lauren’s fifth production as a lighting designer, and her first time designing integrated projections. Many thanks to this team for their continued trust and support, and to my mentors for their guidance. Lastly, a special thank you to my LEDs, though they may be theoretical, they kept this process bright and colorful.

ADDITIONAL RESEARCH IMAGES

Overworld Sunlight.png